News & Features

Flora Meilleur (middle) works with teachers participating in her project, helping them mix the protein solution lysozyme with a salt solution to form a crystal. The teachers mix the solutions in various concentrations and ratios and observe the results. (
JULY 29, 2016

Summer break for a group of science educators and students means hands-on research in high-heat plasmas, supercomputer construction, biofuels and more, thanks to the annual Math-Science-Technology Institute held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.


Flora Meilleur (middle) works with teachers participating in her project,
helping them mix the protein solution lysozyme with a salt solution
to form a
The High Flux Isotope Reactor, a Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility that creates continuous neutron beams, is the site of a new neutrino experiment. Yale-led PROSPECT will probe neutrinos formed as a byproduct of radioactive decay proces

JUNE 17, 2016

Soon to be deployed at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an experiment to explore new physics associated with neutrinos.


The High Flux Isotope Reactor, a Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility
that creates continuous neutron beams, is the site of a new neutrino experiment.
Yale-led PROSPECT will probe neutrinos formed as a byproduct of
radioactive decay processes. Image

APRIL 1, 2016

The Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences is now the Shull Wollan Center—A Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences, named in honor of two esteemed physicists and pioneers in neutron scattering, Clifford Shull and Ernest Wollan.


Ernest Wollan (left) and Clifford Shull (right) work with a double-crystal neutron
spectrometer at the ORNL X-10 Graphite Reactor in 1949. (Credit: ORNL)

Despite decades of trying, scientists have not been able to definitively measure how long neutrons live outside of atomic nuclei—the best experiments in the world produce conflicting results.

APRIL 14, 2016

How a neutron’s life ends is not a mystery to physicists. Exactly when that happens, however, is a much trickier puzzle to solve.


Despite decades of trying, scientists have not been able to
definitively measure how long neutrons live outside of atomic nuclei
—the best experiments in the world produce conflicting results.

Working on opposite sides of the Atlantic and

This rendering illustrates the excitation of a spin liquid on a honeycomb lattice using neutrons. As with many other liquids, it is difficult to see a spin liquid unless it is "splashed," in this case by neutrons depicted as moving balls. The misaligned a

APRIL 7, 2016

OAK RIDGE, Tenn. April 7, 2016 – Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory used neutrons to uncover novel behavior in materials that holds promise for quantum computing. The findings, published in Nature Materials, provide evidence for long-sought phenomena in a two-dimensional magnet.


This rendering illustrates the excitation of a spin liquid on a honeycomb lattice
using neutrons. As
The dynamics of “contrast enhanced” unilamellar lipid vesicles reveal the local mechanical properties of nanoscopic domains. Image credit: Barmak Mostofian, John Nickels and Renee Manning

MARCH 31, 2016

Lipid molecules have split personalities—one part loves water, whereas the other avoids it at all costs. Lipids make up cell membranes, the frontline defense in preventing cellular access to bacterial and viral invaders.


The dynamics of “contrast enhanced” unilamellar lipid vesicles reveal the local
mechanical properties of nanoscopic domains.
Image credit: Barmak Mostofian, John Nickels and Renee Manning
David Mandrus removes a crucible from a glowing hot furnace. High temperatures and controlled atmospheres are needed to produce new crystalline materials. Photo by Jennie Andrews.

JANUARY 28, 2016

In the mid-1960s, Silicon Valley pioneer Gordon Moore made a now-famous prediction that the number of transistors incorporated in a chip would approximately double every twenty-four months. This maxim—known as Moore’s Law—has been the impetus for semiconductor development ever since.


David Mandrus removes a crucible from a glowing hot furnace. High temperatures
and controlled atmospheres are needed to produce
A group of researchers is using neutrons to study the atomic dynamics of liquid metals is key to unlocking the mystery of the atomistic origin of viscosity. From left to right are Adam Vogt (ORNL), Takeshi Egami (UTK, JINS), Robert Ashcraft (WUSTL), Chris

NOVEMBER 23, 2015

With liquid everywhere around us, it’s surprising to learn how little is really understood about the fundamental properties of liquids, like viscosity, at the atomic level. For a group of researchers working at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Spallation Neutron Source, using neutrons to study the atomic dynamics of liquid metals is key to unlocking the mystery of the atomistic origin of viscosity.


A group of
test

JULY 9, 2015

Alan Tennant has been appointed director of the Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The institute is a partnership between ORNL and UT.

“Neutrons are the future in characterizing materials, especially soft matter,” said Taylor Eighmy, vice chancellor for research and engagement. “With Alan as director, we can begin to establish deep thought leadership at UT and ORNL

The ultra-thin semiconductor, which is about 100,000 times thinner than a human hair, stretches across the top of the photonic cavity.

MARCH 24, 2015


A recent breakthrough in laser technology was made possible with the help of two members of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and highlighted in Nature, a prestigious weekly science journal.